Nikon Prostaff 7s vs Vortex Diamondback – The Riflescope for Your Next Adventure

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Nikon Prostaff 7s vs Vortex Diamondback

Most people are familiar with riflescopes and what they can do but those in the hunting business are always debating about the best scopes to take on their next adventure. How do Nikon Prostaff 7s and Vortex Diamondback measure on this scale?

Bird hunting is a hobby that I have had for most of my life. My father introduced me to it at the age of 17 and I was immediately hooked on this adrenaline-charged activity. During the yearly hunting season around September, I like to go up to the Timberlake Preserve in Florida to hunt for birds with a group of other shooters and hunters.

Riflescopes are mandatory to perform this sport and I love to have the best available in the market. Last hunting season, I had my favorite scopes break on me and while out in the range and this year I am out shopping for my net big adventure.

I found these great riflescope brands with the same lens but different magnification and picking on from the other proved challenging. So, I made a review of them to help myself and others select the best of the two.

What are the differences between Nikon Prostaff 7s vs Vortex Diamondback?

Model
Nikon Prostaff 7s
Vortex Diamondback
Reticle
BDC
Dead-Hold BDC
Magnification
3-9x
4-12x
Lens Diameter
40mm
40mm
Eye Relief
3.6 inches
3.1 inches
Field of View
11.3 -33.8 feet/ 100 yards
32.4-11.3 feet/ 100 yards
Weight
15 ounces
14.6 ounces
Length
12.4 inches
12 inches
Availability

Nikon Prostaff 7s vs Vortex Diamondback – How do they compare?

Turrets

The turrets on the Prostaff 7s have indicators showing two options; 1 click equals ¼” at 100 yards and 1 click equals 7mm at 100 meters. They have quick translations for effective and accurate adjustments for your specific measurement needs.

They have positive clicks and they feel good to touch. They are not hard to turn neither are they too lose to risk any bumping. The Vortex caps are made of Aluminum and have gnarling for good grasp but you will have to turn them multiple times for them to come off.

The turrets on Diamondback are MOA with ¼ inch finger adjustments and they are easy to re-zero by pulling up the turret tab slide it over to zero and drop it back down. Some reset tensions don’t line up properly so you could lookout for that. There is no ZeroStop function but there is a revolution counter under the turrets which is handy.

Prostaff 7s outdoes the Diamondback because they provide a definitive ZeroStop function meaning that getting back to the original settings after shooting the rifle will be easy and accurate. 

Reticle 

Prostaff 7s has a BDC reticle with metallic crosshairs which means that in low light conditions, they attract light and stand out as you look through the optics. In bright light, they are dark in contrast which helps zero in on your target. This cope affords the user favorable eye relief measuring 3.6 inches.

The reticle in Vortex Diamondback has some discoloration in the edges but very crisp within the image and accommodates bullet drop compensation. The reticle has MOA sub-tensions to match the turret sub-tensions and corrections. It doesn’t have parallax adjustments or illumination and the eye-relief at 3.1 inches is quite low which causes some stress.

Prostaff 7’s metallic crosshairs give the scope’s reticle an edge over the Diamondback because they are both enabled with Bullet Drop Compensation properties. 

Field of View

The magnification ring on the Vortex Diamondback has numbers printed on the back of the crown which makes it easy to see when you are behind the gun and it is quite stiff even after months of use. This is a second focal plane scope and it has a fast-focus eyepiece in the rear that works smoothly and holds the position you set it to.

On the Nikon, we have a tab that can be finger-tuned or you can grab it as a firm anchor point to turn and rotate it. This tab makes a significant difference when out in the field. They have good focus rings on the back that are easy to actuate with the Nikon being a little bit more positive and easier to turn compared to the Vortex.

Both scopes gather significant amounts of light in low light and they have a wide field of view which helps in easy identification and tracking of a target.

Nikon Prostaff 7s vs Vortex Diamondback – A Comparison Overview 

Nikon Prostaff 7s Review 

Nikon ProStaff 3-9 x 40 Black Matte Riflescope (BDC)
  • Compact riflescope with 3 to 9x magnification and 40mm objective lens
  • Fully multicoated optical system transmits up to 98 percent of available light
  • Zero-reset turret with spring-loaded adjustment knob; 3.6 inches of eye relief
  • Nitrogen-filled, O-ring-sealed housing for waterproof, fogproof performance

Has a pair of plastic scope covers that do a great job of keeping out dust but feature no scope rings or sunshades. It has a quick focus eye adjustment with a rubber knob and frame that is super durable. Their lenses are fully multicoated with 98% light transmission and the zero-reset turrets are 0.25 MOA easy adjustments.

It is waterproof, fog-proof, available in Nikon’s BDC reticle which paired with the SpotOn software, makes your aim more accurate, and extends your effective range. This scope offers 3-9x magnification with a 40mm objective lens, a field of view between 11.3-33.8 feet at 100 yards, an exit pupil 4.4-13.3mm, and is set to 80 MOA Parallax.

Pros

  • Water & fog proof
  • Metallic crosshairs
  • Clear images
  • 80 MOA parallax

Cons

  • Not quite hardy

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Vortex Diamondback Review 

Vortex Optics Diamondback 4-12x40 Second Focal Plane Riflescope - Dead-Hold BDC Reticle (MOA) with Baseball Hat
  • The Diamondback 3.5-10x50 riflescope is one of multiple configurations in the Diamondback lineup and is...
  • Dead-Hold BDC reticle is good for any hunting or shooting at varying ranges where estimating hold-over...
  • Lenses are fully multi-coated for crystal clear, bright images from dawn till dusk The fast focus...
  • Metal on metal precision turrets offer the ability to zero reset after sight-in A precision glide erector...

This is a second focal plane scope. It is made of standard aircraft-grade aluminum and it is water-proof, fog-proof, and shockproof. It has no issues shifting zero after firing. The magnification ring has numbers printed on the back of the crown which makes it easy to see when you are behind the gun and it is quite stiff even after months of use.

The glass quality has some mirage but gives bright images with no issues identifying targets. The reticle has some discoloration in the edges but very crisp within the image and accommodates bullet drop compensation. The reticle has MOA sub-tensions to match the turret sub-tensions and corrections.

It doesn’t have parallax adjustments or illumination and the eye-relief at 3.1 inches is quite low which causes some stress. To overcome that, you could mount it on a rail to help move it back a little bit for some comfort.

Pros

  • Printed magnification rings
  • Matching sub-tensions
  • Fast focus eyepiece

Cons

  • Short eye relief
  • No illumination

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Conclusion 

Nikon Prostaff 7s has better image clarity and better eye relief for even more comfortable use of the scope. Regardless of the time of day or the rifle you mount it on, this is the scope for all your adventures.

Vortex Diamondback is a lightweight scope that will keep the weight of your entire setup down and as long as it is mounted on a rail, it will give you the favorable distance from your eye to prevent your brow from getting scoped.

Final Verdict: So, which is better? Nikon Prostaff 7s or Vortex Diamondback?

All factors considered, the Nikon Prostaff 7s is better than the Vortex Diamondback. This is because they provide more light-transmission abilities, lesser chromatic aberration, better eye relief, darker reticle crosshairs, and crisper images.

FAQs

What makes the Vortex Diamondback’s lenses full-proof?

The lenses are Argon gas purged and o-ring sealed to prevent fogging, dust and moisture from seeping into the binoculars chamber. This maximizes their effective performance in all conditions.

What is the best lens cover type to use on the Nikon Prostaff?

The Butler Creek number 19 is ideal for the eyepiece and the number 31 is perfect for the objective lens of the 3-9×40 Nikon scope.

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